This books discusses Intervals, Scales, Chords, Arpeggios, and Circle of Fifths and Fourths.

What are the notes making up a major chord in the 5 string b

Postby sheltonbenjamin » Sat Jan 05, 2013 4:57 am

I know that for a guitar, you play a major chord by playing the 1st, 4th, and 7th note in the scale (Ex: you play an A (1st note in scale), C (4th note in scale), and E (7th note in scale) to make an A chord on a guitar). What would be the equivalent numbering for the 5 string banjo?
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Re: What are the notes making up a major chord in the 5 string b

Postby JumpingJackFlash » Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:45 pm

I know that for a guitar, you play a major chord by playing the 1st, 4th, and 7th note in the scale (Ex: you play an A (1st note in scale), C (4th note in scale), and E (7th note in scale) to make an A chord on a guitar).


This doesn't make any sense.
Musical notes follow the letters of the alphabet: ABCDEFGABC...

So, in the scale of A minor (for example), A is the 1st note, B is the 2nd and so on.

Triads are the simplest type of chords you can get.
To play a triad, you play the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the scale. Basically, you play one, miss one, play one, miss one, play one. Looking at the pattern on the piano might be useful.
In A minor, this would be A, C and E.

You'll notice that these are the same notes that you mentioned above (and it's important to realise that this is an A minor triad, not an "A chord", which usually means A major).

The same pattern is used for all triads.
C major for example starts with C, you miss out D, play E, miss out F, and play G: CEG
D minor is DFA
E minor is EGB
F major is FAC
G major is GBD

(Notice that some of these are major, and some are minor. - Major triads have 4 semitones between the first two notes and 3 between the top two, whereas minor triads are the other way around).

How you finger these on any guitar-type instrument depends on how its strings are tuned. There are usually many different ways to finger the same chord.
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